Forensic Crime Scene Analysis in Developing Offender Profiles

nbsp.Forensic evidence, details concerning the mode of attack, the victim is chosen and other pertinent details are collected by the profiler and these serve as the foundation on which the offender profile is developed. Thus the importance of forensic crime scene analysis in developing the offender profile cannot be stressed enough. The evidence gathered at the scene of the crime, both physical and behavioral serves as the springboard on which the profiler gains access to the criminal mind.

Over the years, forensic technology has improved vastly and has had a tremendous impact on police investigations as we know it. Some people go as far as to say that the infamous Jack the Ripper would have been nabbed if Scotland Yard could have had the benefits of the enhanced forensic technology available today. Be that as it may, evidence in the form of a fingerprint left on the crime scene, a shoe print, physical evidence like hair, fibers, semen, blood or other bodily fluids can go a long way in helping the police to identify the perpetrator. Locard’s Exchange Principle was a groundbreaking development in forensic technology. According to Saferstein, … states that when an offender comes into contact with a location or another person an exchange of evidence occurs (cited by Turvey, 2002, p.40). Consequently, the perpetrator leaves a part of himself behind while also taking something with him that is bound to link him to the crime. Physical evidence left behind may be compared against a database of known offenders and more often than not the identity of the perpetrator can be established. Fingerprint technology .DNA profiling can further be used to create an airtight case against the offender.