It’s a Flat World After All

America’s crisis is neither the typical crisis archetype of poverty, disease or hunger nor is it an a-here-and-now crisis. This is a crisis that is more of a premonition. According to Friedman (2005), America’s crisis is that it may lose its competitiveness, economic might and eventually superpower status in the near future to the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) economies. This argument is a call to action, for the U.S. to wake up, get focused and implement strategies geared towards building strong individuals given that the playing field has been leveled.
Following from the article, It’s a Flat World, After All, it is evident that the major driver behind what the author refers to as flattening of the world is the coming together of globalization and information technology (IT). And if we were to view America as a business entity – not just as a country – then we would be in a better position to use principles that apply to business entities to critique Friedman’s arguments. In this discussion, therefore, we shall assume that America is a mega-corporation that seeks to survive, grow and develop, and sustain its profitability in today’s ultra-competitive global market. We shall use two principles that have thus far proven to be successful for other corporations in our evaluation. These principles are business process reengineering (BPR) and enterprise resource planning (ERP).
Business process reengineering (BPR) is the fundamental rethinking and radical redesign of business processes to achieve dramatic improvements in critical contemporary measures of performance such as costs, quality, and speed (Hammer amp. Champy, 2003). In this definition, we identify four keywords: fundamental, radical, dramatic and process. A quick overview of the definitions of each of these keywords enlightens the discussion on how BPR has the potential to help America take advantage of the technology and geo-economic changes to tackle its looming crisis. Fundamental refersnbsp.to the re-evaluation of primary goals and ignoring rules and assumptions formulated in the past.